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Top 3 things we learned from Bills vs. Dolphins | Week 3

Top 3 things we learned from Bills vs. Dolphins | Week 3

The Bills and Miami Dolphins will square off in an AFC East game on Sunday for the first time since the Bills upset the Dolphins 47-34 on December 19, 1993, when the division’s top spot was at stake.

The Bills have a 9-1 record versus Miami during the Sean McDermott era as head coach. Additionally, since 2020, the squad has had a winning percentage of.917 against AFC East teams and is 11-1 against divisional opponents, which is the highest in the league for any team over the last three seasons. Will McDermott guide the group to yet another triumph to increase their winning numbers?

Here are some other patterns and landmarks to look out for when the Bills hit the field at Hard Rock Stadium in Miami, regardless of whether Josh Allen throws any more touchdown passes or not.

Bills vs Dolphins: Team milestones/trends

  • The Bills have a chance to become the fifth club since 2000 to start the season with three games in which they score at least 100 points and allow no more than 40.
  • The Bills can make their club-record winning streak against the Dolphins eight games long with a victory. Since a 10-game winning streak against the Cincinnati Bengals from 1989 through 2010, this would be the team’s longest winning streak against a single opponent.
  • The Bills would have TDs on the first drive in six straight regular-season games with a TD, the longest streak for the team since at least 1970, if they scored on their first drive. With playoff games included, the 8-game streak started by the Bills with an opening-drive touchdown would tie the Atlanta Falcons’ streak from 2016 as the longest in the NFL since 1983.
  • The Bills can set a new NFL record and record their 21st straight win by at least 10 points if they win by double digits. The first record for 20 straight victories in double digits was accomplished by the Chicago Bears in 1940–1941.

A gutsy battle to the end

The Bills were aware that they would be severely shorthanded on Sunday because they were missing their starting center on offense and four starters on defense. However, it had little effect on their perseverance and hard work on Sunday in Miami’s oppressive heat.

As the game approached halftime, players left the game due to heat fatigue or an injury, draining the roster of any remaining depth.

Spencer Brown, the right tackle, left the game in the first half due to heat exhaustion, and David Quessenberry replaced him. Additionally affected by the heat were TE Dawson Knox and WR Isaiah McKenzie, however, McKenzie was able to continue playing.

“It was so hot,” said McKenzie, a south Florida native. “It was hot the whole game. I started throwing up, so I’m like, ‘Okay, I’m going to just take a breather.’ So, I came out and had to come back to the locker room and get an IV. I thought was used to this just coming from Miami, but I guess I’m more familiar with Buffalo at this moment.”

Fellow South Florida native Greg Rousseau confirmed McKenzie’s assessment of the weather.

“It was up there like top two top three hottest I’d say,” said Rousseau who played his college ball in the same stadium for the University of Miami. “We had a real hot game against Georgia Tech, but even in college football, you don’t always kick off at 1 pm. You get like four o’clock kick off. Sometimes it’s a night game. Being out there at 1pm is different.”

In addition to the players abandoning the game due to heat exhaustion, there were additional players who had injuries. After making a catch in the first half, WR Jake Kumerow suffered an ankle injury and was unable to continue, leaving Buffalo with only four receivers. After suffering a hand injury, rookie corner Christian Benford was only able to participate on special teams. JaMarcus Ingram, a practice squad call-up and undrafted rookie, was compelled to play corner.

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