Microsoft to cut over 10,000 jobs; engineering, human resource division to be impacted
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Microsoft to cut over 10,000 jobs; engineering, human resource division to be impacted

Microsoft to cut over 10,000 jobs; engineering, human resource division to be impacted
Microsoft

According to estimates, Microsoft Corp. is considering eliminating 11,000 jobs, or around 5% of its total staff. The corporation intends to reduce the number of engineering divisions through new rounds of layoffs, according to the article.

According to news reports, Microsoft Corp. wants to remove thousands of employees, some of which are believed to be in the engineering and human resources departments. The projected layoffs would be the most recent in the American technology sector, where businesses like Meta Platforms Inc. and Amazon.com Inc. have started reduction steps in response to weak demand and a worsening outlook for the global economy.

The move by Microsoft may indicate that job losses in the IT sector will continue. Microsoft plans to cut 11,000 employees, or around 5% of the workforce, according to sources quoted by U.K. network Sky News.

A source with knowledge of the matter claims that the company anticipates eliminating jobs in numerous technical divisions on Wednesday. Microsoft may downsize its recruitment team by up to one-third, according to an insider. The reported cutbacks will be much more drastic than in previous rounds.

As of June 30, the corporation employed 221,000 full-time employees, including 122,000 in the US and 99,000 abroad, according to documents. Microsoft is under pressure to maintain Azure’s growth rates after the personal computer sector declined for several quarters. This is due to the fact that Windows and gadget sales suffered.

Even yet, the business has put off severe personnel reductions longer than many other industry leaders. Amazon, a cloud competitor, is laying off more than 18,000 employees, the most it has ever done. Significant job cuts were announced by Facebook’s parent company Meta in October, while Twitter Inc., a struggling social network, cut about half of its workforce.

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